Discussion: Take Criticism or Stop Responding to It!

You don’t need to agree with all of the criticism you get for your story, but if you can’t take criticism, you really don’t deserve the fame and clout you’re getting.

I’m tired of authors trying to dictate who speaks about their story, where and how. I’m tired of authors claiming that the criticism is “unwanted”.

Fine, if you don’t personally want to listen to it and grow as an author (because, you know, there are often good suggestions in there), then just don’t pay attention to it. But let other people learn from your story if you’re not willing to. You don’t get to silence free speech on your story just because you’re acting like an entitled brat.

Sorrynotsorry (do people still say that?)

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I mean. Yeah. It’s one step away from freaking Uwe Boll challenging his critics to boxing matches to beat the crap out of them instead of listening to solid criticism. He’s also one of the worst writer/directors of all time too. There always seems to be a pattern there, huh? Almost like. Criticism is a way to like. Improve

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I’ll just say my opinion:
As long as the reader criticizes the story respectfully, and in order to help the author to grow, it shouldn’t be a big deal. So, I don’t understand these authors who don’t learn to take criticism. Like, excuse you? Just because it is your story, it doesn’t mean that you have a right to silence people by saying “no criticism” or anything like this. Once you publish your story, it means that you take into account that you will get criticisms. Positive and negative. Positive is nice, but what can make you want to improve more is a negative criticism (unless it is done disrespectfully). As the sentence says:
עדיף להיבנות על ביקורת מאשר להיהרס ע"י מחמאות (translation: better to be built on criticism than to be destroyed by compliments). So, seems like the authors who can’t take criticisms would rather be destroyed by compliments.
Annndd, if you don’t have a criticism (=if you don’t take criticism), then you probably aren’t especially successful.

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That’s a really good saying! I love it!

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Honestly, no matter what you do, write, say, there’s always going to be somebody who’s ready to criticize you. Yeah, if they’re being rude about it, then go ahead and be upset. They’re being rude, and it’s making people upset.
On the other hand, if they’re trying to be helpful and constructive, then don’t be mad. They’re trying to help you, not put you down.
C’mon, you have to learn that you’re not going to be so perfect that nobody will have anything to say against you. Don’t be a b*tch about it.

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So true! People need to learn to tell the difference :woman_facepalming:t4:

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I love criticism, but, there’s a difference between being rude and constructive criticism. Agree?

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Definitely! And if a fan is being rude, they deserve to get called out for the rude bits, not the criticism. Like if they’re like “Your characterisation is terrible and you suck”, we should be calling them out for the “you suck” part, not tone policing what adjective people use to describe the work :stuck_out_tongue:

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Exactly! You hit the head on the nail. :wink:

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Criticism is useful and helps you grow as an author. It helps improve your story and get better at writing. :yellow_heart::sparkling_heart::gift_heart:

I hate it when somebody sends an author some constructive criticism and then they lash out yelling “this is my story. I can write the way I want and I don’t care if it glorifies toxic relationships/gangs/whatever”. :roll_eyes::black_heart:

Learn to take constructive criticism. With criticism that isn’t helpful, like hate-mail or plain garbage, either don’t respond or politely respond and call them out on the hate. :heart:

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Totally agree. As long as the criticism is constructive and not a hate speech, no one should take it hard and come at anyone.
And of course, both reader and author should know the differences between criticising the story and criticising the author himself/herself.

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Exactly!

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Yeah, I agree with this too. People can critize all they want but there is no need to be rude about it. I wish people would understand that. Just because your brutally honest doesn’t mean that you should tear into someone for mistakes or telling them they could of done this differently. I can be brutally honest but I know when to say it or I explain why I said it like that so that they know I’m not being rude about the tip I’m giving.

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“You suck” or “your story is lame” is not constructive criticism.

“Even better if you…” or “I suggest that…” is constructive criticism. As long as they’re not rude.

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I mean constructive criticism can be rude. Some very very good critics come across as very blunt or very rude, they’re just also very good at finding the bad things in a work of art.

Whether or not it’s solicited is the problem. This is why most places have a section to share art free of criticism, because if you want criticism, you open yourself to all of it.

If what you wrote isn’t very good, or what you drew is literally unrecognisable you need to know. Otherwise you’re going to embarrass yourself in more public forums.

I should mention its also absolutely fair to have an issue with someone’s Critique. Question them about it, ask them why they said what they did. If they have good backup and reason for it, it’s valid criticism. If they just insult you more, it’s a troll. It’s a two way street. You can’t dictate how people Critique as much as critics can’t dictate how someone tells their story

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Just also keep in mind that opening yourself to criticism is literally the best way to improve as an artist. You’re not gonna get veery far making the same mistakes, especially the ones you don’t notice yourself.

So, ‘criticism-free’ areas should only ever really be used for when you’re not comfortable with criticism, and ‘unsollicited’ criticism will inevitably happen when you get a following. And it should. Because now people are spending time (and money) on your work, they have the right to voice concerns, and that won’t always be polite. What matters is if they have a point

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And even more so the ones you’re not willing to admit you make!

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I feel like we also need to keep in mind that it’s not just you who learns from criticism of your work. Any reader of your stories who is inspired by you and stumbles upon the criticism can learn from it! You’re not just depriving yourself of the criticism that could help you improve by silencing your critics. You’re dooming the people who consider you a role model to an inability to analyse your work. You could very well be setting them up to make the same mistakes as you.

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Coming from an author, I’m all for criticism because I know it’ll make me a better and smarter author. I’m down for it, but I hate it when people try to bash an author’s story. At that point, that isn’t criticism, that’s discouragement towards the author.

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I love criticism. In a way. Without the tough love from my cynical (not really) friends (Insert talented artist) I never would’ve gotten better.

Old Art

Before this was all I could do. I did post this recently on episode to show old work I was trying to fix. You can’t really fix old art.

New Art

I got better.

Of course there’s a difference between constructive criticism and jusy being straight up mean. Rise above the mean comments, take the tough love. Because it means they see something in you, something that tells them you can be going great places.

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